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Delhi Tour Travel

  • Delhi Tourism, a government undertaking facilitating tourism since 1975 will take you to a guided tour of the Delhi through this website which explores the wonders of this city be it its heritage, the art and crafts, the diverse cuisine and culture.

    A symbol of the country’s rich past and thriving present, Delhi is a city where ancient and modern blend seamlessly together. It is a place that not only touches your pulse but even fastens it to a frenetic speed. Home to millions of dreams, the city takes on unprecedented responsibilities of realizing dreams bringing people closer and inspiring their thoughts.

    Just a century ago, the British moved the seat of their empire from Kolkata to Delhi. And it has been the Capital of India ever since. Now a thriving, cosmopolitan metro, the city has much to celebrate as it has already reached the milestone of completing 100 years as a Capital. With a history that goes back many centuries, Delhi showcases an ancient culture and a rapidly modernising country. Dotted with monuments there is much to discover here. The seat of many powerful empires in the past, its long history can be traced in its many carefully-preserved monuments, ancient forts and tombs.

    All this is combined with the best features of a modern city such as a metro system, bustling markets and fabulous eating places. The past and the present meld seamlessly together, making centuries-old monuments a part of the city’s daily life. Delhi is very much a history’s child. The story of the city is as old as the epic Mahabharata, when the town was known as Indraprastha, where Pandavas used to live. Over the centuries, eight more cities came alive adjacent to Indraprastha: Lal Kot, Siri, Dinpanah, Quila Rai Pithora, Ferozabad, Jahanpanah, Tughlakabad and Shahjahanabad. Many empires rose to the heights of their power and were destroyed here. Among the prominent dynasties which made Delhi their capital were the Tughlaqs, the Khiljis and the Mughals.

    Even today, one can have a fascinating glimpse into the past in Old Delhi, with its labyrinth of narrow lanes, old havelis, and colourful bazaars. Rickshaws wind their way through this crowded, bustling capital of the Mughals, where life continues, much as it did hundreds of years ago. It is home to three World Heritage monuments—Qutub Minar, Red Fort and Humayun’s Tomb that have survived many centuries, and give an idea of architectural wonders created by emperors in the past. Central Delhi, with its tree-lined avenues, imposing structures and buildings such as the Rashtrapati Bhavan, Parliament House and India Gate, reflect Delhi’s colonial past. A number of museums provide a glimpse into the country’s fascinating history.

    Delhi Top Palaces :-

    Akshardham Temple
    Akshardham in New Delhi epitomizes 10,000 years of Indian culture in all its breathtaking grandeur, beauty, wisdom an d bliss. It brilliantly showcases the essence of India’s ancient architecture, traditions and timeless spiritual messages. The Akshardham experience is an enlightening journey through India’s glorious art, values and contributions for the progress, happiness and harmony of mankind.

    Lotus Temple
    The Lotus Temple is an exceptionally beautiful structure, created by the Bahá'í House of Worship, situated in South Delhi and looks like a white lotus. It was built by the Bahá'í community.

    Humayun's Tomb
    Located at Nizamuddin East at Mathura Road in New Delhi, Humayun's Tomb is one of the most beautiful and visited tombs in India. It was built during the period of Mughal era. The Humayun tomb is a perfect reflection of Persian architecture. The tomb was built by Humayun's wife, Hamida Banu Begum in 1569-70 in the memory of her husband after the nine months of his death. The Humayun's tomb made with stunning red sandstone was considered as the first and foremost garden style tombs in India. The tomb is built in the middle of charbagh style of gardens. The tomb has two entrances – one at South and another at West. However, the South side is the main entrance of the tomb.

    India Gate
    At the centre of New Delhi stands the 42 m high India Gate, an "Arc-de-Triomphe" like archway in the middle of a crossroad. Almost similar to its French counterpart, it commemorates the 70,000 Indian soldiers who lost their lives fighting for the British Army during the World War I. The memorial bears the names of more than 13,516 British and Indian soldiers killed in the Northwestern Frontier in the Afghan war of 1919.

    Jama Masjid
    This famous monument was constructed at Chawri Bazaar during the Mughal period. It is located near Chandni Chowk at the center of Old Delhi. It was built in 17th century by the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan. It has many entrances leading to the prime worship deck. The mosque was exquisitely designed in Mughal Architectural style with two minarets and a few domes in onion shape. The giant upper floor can hold up to 25,000 people at a time.
    You will find vendors selling various items which include clothes, accessories, household goods, cosmetics, electronic products and many other things in the surroundings of Jama Masjid. First time visitors need to be careful from pick pocketers in the market. There are many eating outlets in the vicinity including the well known restaurant Karim’s.

    Jantar Mantar
    The Jantar Mantar is located in the modern city of New Delhi. It consists of 13 architectural astronomy instruments. The site is one of five built by Maharaja Jai Singh II of Jaipur, from 1724 onwards, as he was given by Mughal emperor Muhammad Shah the task of revising the calendar and astronomical tables. There is a plaque fixed on one of the structures in the Jantar Mantar observatory in New Delhi that was placed there in 1910 mistakenly dating the construction of the complex to the year 1710. Later research, though, suggests 1724 as the actual year of construction.The primary purpose of the observatory was to compile astronomical tables, and to predict the times and movements of the sun, moon and planets. Some of these purposes nowadays would be classified as astronomy.Completed in 1724, the Delhi Jantar Mantar had decayed considerably by 1867.

    Purana Quila
    One does not have to go far to see the old fort or Purana Quila standing stoically amidst wild greenery.Built on the site of the most ancient of the numerous cities of Delhi, Indraprastha, Purana Quila is roughly rectangular in shape having a circuit of nearly two kilometers.

    Qutab Minar
    Qutab Minar is a soaring, 73 m-high tower of victory, built in 1193 by Qutab-ud-din Aibak immediately after the defeat of Delhi's last Hindu kingdom. The tower has five distinct storeys, each marked by a projecting balcony and tapers from a 15 m diameter at the base to just 2.5 m at the top. The first three storeys are made of red sandstone; the fourth and fifth storeys are of marble and sandstone. At the foot of the tower is the Quwwat-ul-Islam Mosque, the first mosque to be built in India. An inscription over its eastern gate provocatively informs that it was built with material obtained from demolishing '27 Hindu temples'. A 7 m-high iron pillar stands in the courtyard of the mosque. It is said that if you can encircle it with your hands while standing with your back to it your wish will be fulfilled.

    Rashtrapathi Bhavan
    Rashtrapati Bhavan, home to the President of the world’s largest democracy, is emblematic of Indian democracy and its secular, plural and inclusive traditions. It was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and Herbert Baker and stands on a 330 acre estate. It took seventeen years to build this presidential palace which was completed in the year 1929. Almost seven hundred million bricks and three million cubic feet of stone were used in building this architectural marvel that has 2.5 kilometers of corridors and 190 acres of garden area. The main building covers an area of 5 acres and has 340 rooms spread over four floors. The famous Mughal Gardens of the Rashtrapati Bhavan cover an area of 15 acres and have 159 celebrated varieties of roses, 60 varieties of bougainvillea and many other verities of flowers. The Estate also has a state-of-the-art Rashtrapati Bhavan Museum Complex (RBMC) comprising the Clock Tower, the Stables and the Garages showcasing past as well as current presidencies, the regal ceremonies, and the rich flora and fauna of Rashtrapati Bhavan, amongst other things.

    Red Fort
    One of the most spectacular pieces of Mughal Architecture is the Lal Quila or the Red Fort. Built by the Mughal emperor, Shah Jahan between 1638 and 1648, the Red Fort has walls extending up to 2 kms. in length with the height varying from 18 mts. on the river side to 33 mts. on the city side.
    The entry to this splendid fort is from the Lahori Gate or the Chatta Chowk. Lal Quila is now a busy market place called the 'Meena Bazaar'. This bazaar has an excellent collection of antiques, miniature paintings and skillfully crafted fake ivory jewellery. The bazaar also sells some fabulous carpets beautifully woven. Just beyond the Chhata Chowk, is the heart of the fort called Naubat Khana, or the Drum House. Musicians used to play for the emperor from the Naubat Khana, and the arrival of princes and royalty was heralded from here.
    The Fort sports all the obvious trappings befitting a vital centre of Mughal governance: halls of public and private audiences, domed and arched marble palaces, plush private apartments, a mosque, and elaborately designed gardens. Even today, the Fort remains an impressive testimony to Mughal grandeur, despite being attacked by the Persian Emperor Nadir Shah in 1739, and by the British soldiers, during the war of independence in 1857.

    Lodi Tomb
    The old Lady Willington Park, now known as Lodhi Garden, is dotted with monuments of Sayyid and Lodhi Periods, which include tombs mosques, and bridges. The old Lady Willington Park, now known as Lodhi Garden, is dotted with monuments of Sayyid and Lodhi Periods, which include tombs mosques, and bridges.